Playing Games Of Awareness

I guess I just wonder most of the time, are people really that stupid* or are they just afraid of what others may do to them if others thought they were smarter than the other? Or, maybe, they are not afraid at all, they KNOW they will get fired and choose to not bother being smart in public to their own harm?

Or maybe they think that what they think is something they should keep to themselves?  Then I wonder why they do not choose to share them?  And then I wonder why I wonder WHY anyone else makes the choices they make?  *tangent*

Or, maybe, smart people keep their smart thoughts to themselves because they think they can leverage them later for a paycheck or something?  that money thing always seems to be a powerful organizer of thoughts here on planet earth, i wonder what would happen if everyone shared their thoughts just because it was what it took to save the planet?

*I KNOW.  I know “stupid” is not “A Nice Word” (as in “use your nice words to say hard things”); yet, sometimes, ‘stupid is as stupid does’ is just the plain truth that deserves no trimmings.

Here’s the strategy behind Airbnb’s mobile web redesign

Nikohl Vandel:

we just had our official photo session for AirBNB =) come visit us in the desert soon!

Originally posted on Gigaom:

Airbnb has redesigned its mobile web experience, bringing it into responsive union with its desktop website. The two applications will now work in sync, so changes made and features added to one will also appear on the other.

The shift highlights the growing importance of the mobile web and how to tackle its design structure. Airbnb has taken the stance that the mobile web is a funnel for people who are new to the Airbnb experience. They end up there by clicking links shared by friends or other media. They haven’t yet downloaded the app, but they want to be able to explore what Airbnb is about.

Therefore Airbnb wanted its mobile web homepage, unlike its mobile app, to look more like a landing page for newcomers. The mobile web became its own distinct experience, instead of a copy cat of either the mobile or desktop app.

It entices them with…

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Make your own filters on this Instagram for photo pros

Nikohl Vandel:

oh, how super cool!

Originally posted on Gigaom:

EyeEm, which is like an Instagram for professional photographers, is now attempting to woo Average Joes to the application. With a new update, EyeEm has added a wide range of such tools, like exposure, contrast, and brightness (but not color). Instead of sticking with preset filters, you can make your own.

An animation showing the new EyeEm editing tools.

An animation showing the new EyeEm editing tools.

It brings a few professional-level editing tools to the masses by simplifying them for mobile use. It’s the kind of application that’s unlikely to ever explode with consumers — Instagram beat it to the mainstream — but with 10 million registered users it’s a crowd pleaser for those looking for a little more mobile photo editing control.

With the edit tool update, the company also introduced a feature called “Open Edit,” where you can inspect a posted photo to see what editing options the person used on it. That way you can copy someone’s editing choices (i.e. filter)…

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Throwback Thursday – Let There Be Light

Nikohl Vandel:

whoo hooo and we still do not have an answer for the nuclear poop that results. #RealNuclearWasteConfidence should be our top priority before doing anything more to support the expansion in this industry.

Originally posted on U.S. NRC Blog:

lightbulbMore than 60 years ago this Saturday, a string of bulbs lit up courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. What was the big deal? The electricity used to power the bulbs was generated by an experimental breeder reactor and was the first electricity produced using the heat of nuclear fission.

Photo from the Department of Energy

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This Little USB Necklace Hacks Your Computer In No Time Flat

Nikohl Vandel:

i don’t think anyone has to bother with that, i put all my stuff out on the internet anyway. oh, wait, i’m not, imho, a villan, i’m just one of those protesters and activist everyone seems to really not like these days.

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

usb

Quick! The bad guy/super villain has left the room! Plug in a mysterious device that’ll hack up their computer while an on-screen progress bar ticks forward to convey to the audience that things are working!

It’s a classic scene from basically every spy movie in history. In this case, however, that mystery device is real.

Samy Kamkar — developer of projects like that massive worm that conquered MySpace back in 2006, or SkyJack, the drone that hijacks other drones — has released a video demonstrating the abilities of a particularly ridiculous “necklace” he sometimes wears around.

Called USBdriveby, it’s a USB-powered microcontroller-on-a-chain, rigged to exploit the inherently awful security flaws lurking in your computer’s USB ports. In about 60 seconds, it can pull off a laundry list of nasty tricks:

  • It starts by pretending to be a keyboard/mouse.
  • If you have a network monitor app like Little Snitch running…

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How much of the world’s arable land is used to grow food?

Originally posted on Eideard:

food vs fuel&feedCrops grown for food (green) versus for animal feed and fuel (purple)

Just 55 percent of the world’s crop calories are actually eaten directly by people. Another 36 percent is used for animal feed. And the remaining 9 percent goes toward biofuels and other industrial uses…

The proportions are even more striking in the United States, where just 27 percent of crop calories are consumed directly — wheat, say, or fruits and vegetables grown in California. By contrast, more than 67 percent of crops — particularly all the soy grown in the Midwest — goes to animal feed. And a portion of the rest goes to ethanol and other biofuels.

Some of that animal feed eventually becomes food, obviously — but it’s a much, much more indirect process. It takes about 100 calories of grain to produce just 12 calories of chicken or 3 calories worth of beef, for instance.

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